Verdict Legal Definition -

Verdict Legal Definition

A jury`s decision is called a verdict. A jury is tasked with hearing evidence presented by both sides in a trial, establishing the facts, applying the relevant law to the facts, and voting on a final verdict. There are different types of verdicts, and the votes required to reach a verdict differ depending on whether the jury hears a criminal or civil case. Although most judgments are upheld by the presiding judge, the judge has the discretion to overturn a judgment in certain circumstances. JUDGMENT, practice. A jury`s unanimous decision reported to the court on matters lawfully referred to it during the hearing of a case. 2. Judgments shall be of a diverse nature, namely secret and public, general, partial and specific. 3. A secret judgment is a judgment that is served on an extrajudicial judge. Such a verdict is served on the judge after the agreement of the jury, for the convenience of the jury, which separates after pronouncement.

This judgment is without any force; and this practice, which can be abused excessively, is rarely, if ever, permitted in the United States. 4. A public judgment is a judgment rendered in open court. This judgment has its full effect, and if it is not overturned, it is conclusive according to the facts, and if a judgment is rendered about it, it excludes any future controversy in personal actions. A private judgment must then be rendered publicly in order to give effect to it. 5. A general judgment is a judgment by which the jury decides simultaneously on the fact and the law, either in favour of the plaintiff or in favour of the defendant. Co. lit. 228; 4 leaves. Com. 461; Prac Code.

by Lo. 519. The jury may render such a verdict whenever it considers it appropriate. 6. A partial verdict in a criminal case is a verdict by which the jury acquits the defendant of part of the charge against him and finds him guilty of delay: Examples of this type of verdict include: if they acquit the accused of one count and find him guilty of another, which is, in fact, a kind of general sentence, since he is usually acquitted on one count and usually convicted on another; If the charge includes a higher and lower offence, the jury may convict the less cruel by rendering a partial verdict. Thus, on charges of burglary, the accused may be convicted of theft and acquitted of entering the night; If charged with murder, he can be convicted of manslaughter; Robbery can be transformed into a single flight; a battery, in a common attack. 1 puppy. Cr.

Law, 638, and the cases cited. 7. A special judgment is a judgment by which the facts of the case are recorded and the law is presented to the judges. Bl. Cas. 376; Breese, 176; 4 Rand. 504; 1 hen. & Munf. 235; 1 Wash. C.

C. 499; 2 Freemasons, 31. The jury has the opportunity, instead of denying or confirming the case as in a general judgment, to find all the facts of the case as they emerge from the evidence before it and, after presenting them, to conclude that “they do not know legally on which side they should be on this side, to find the question; that if the court concludes in the case as a whole that the issue has been proved for the plaintiff, it decides accordingly for the plaintiff and assesses the damage at such a sum, &c.; But if the court is of the opposite opinion, then they find the opposite. This form of finding is called a special judgment. In practice, they have nothing to do with the formal preparation of the special judgment. If it is agreed that such a verdict must be rendered, the jury simply declares that its opinion is a fact that remains uncertain, and then the verdict is adjusted without further interference. It is decided, with correction by the judge, by the counsel and lawyers of both parties according to the statement of facts established by the jury, with regard to all the details on which they have decided, and with regard to the other details according to the state of facts on which it is agreed. that they should find on the basis of the evidence at their disposal.

The special judgment, if its form is so determined, shall be registered with the entire trial proceedings; and the question of law arising from the facts established shall be heard before the bank court and decided by that court as in the case of demurrage. If a party is not satisfied with its decision, it can then go to a fake court. Steph. Pl. 113; 1 Archb. Pr. 189; 3 Bl. 377; Ferry.

Abr. Verdict, D, E. 8. There is another method of rendering a special verdict when the jury renders a verdict generally in favor of the plaintiff, but subject to the opinion of the aforementioned judges or court on a special case given by counsel for both parties in relation to a point of law. 3 Bl. Com. 378; and see 10 Mass. R. 64; 11 Mass. R.

358. See Bouv in general. Index inst., h.t. A general judgment is the most common form of judgment. It is a global decision on an issue. In civil cases, the jury decides in favor of the plaintiff or defendant and determines the liability and amount of damages. In criminal cases, the jury decides “guilty” or “not guilty” on the basis of the charge against the accused. In cases involving a serious crime, the verdict must be unanimous. However, in minor criminal cases, some states allow either a majority or a 10-2 vote.

In civil matters, many States have moved away from the requirement of unanimity and now allow votes of 10 to 2. In the American legal system, the concept of directed judgment has largely been replaced by judgment as a matter of law. Modification (partly in accordance with medieval Latin veredictum) of the Anglo-French veirdit statement, statement, verdict, from Old French veir true (from Latin verus) + dit say, from Latin dictum In criminal proceedings, the verdict, which can be either “not guilty” or “guilty” – except in Scotland, where the verdict “not proven” is also available – is rendered by the jury. Different charges in the same case may result in different sentences. U.S. law does not allow random judgments. A random judgment is a judgment that has been determined not by deliberation, but by some form of chance, such as throwing a coin or drawing lots. While such penalties were once acceptable, they are now illegal. Verdict Legal definition: Legally, a verdict is defined as the decision made by a 12-member jury after a trial. It should be noted that judgments must be accepted by a judge to be final.

The decision of a judge without a jury is NOT a verdict – it is legally defined as a verdict. A partial verdict in a criminal case is a verdict by which the jury acquits the defendant of part of the charge against him and finds him guilty of arrears: Examples of this type of verdict include: if they acquit the accused of one count and find him guilty of another, which is, in fact, a kind of general penalty, since he is usually acquitted of one count and generally convicted of another; If the charge includes a higher and lower offence, the jury may convict the less cruel by rendering a partial verdict.